Do What You Are Good At

Here is some good advice for young Aspergians (people with the Asperger’s syndrome) that really is just as good for any of us.  Related to Autism, Aspergians find social interaction difficult and might also have motor difficulties and tend to get lost in themselves sometimes.  That often makes it tough for an Asbergian to fit into society; but it doesn’t mean he can’t.

In his book Be Different: The Adventures of a Free-Range Aspergian, John Elder Robison says:

“Find out what you’re good at and stick with it. In school, a lot of emphasis is put on identifying your weaknesses and then improving them. That’s important if your weaknesses are holding you back, but it’s not the path to greatness.Greatness happens when you find your unique strengths and build upon them. Building up a weakness just makes you less disabled. Building a strength can take you to the top of the world.”

Not everything requires ideal social interaction to be successful. Not everyone has those skills. But everyone has some skills, and those skills can be honed for success.. Find out what you are good at, train yourself to be even better, find ways to optimize your opportunities with those skills, and just keep riding forward.

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3 Responses to Do What You Are Good At

  1. Excellent point. Why spend your time on doing something that your not good at when you could be spending it on improving something that you are good at.

    Dan Akyroyd claims to have a mild case of Aspergers.

  2. Great work. Improving weaknesses is good but something which makes us unique and help us to be at the top is our strength. But I think we should concentrate on what we enjoy doing rather than what we are good at.

  3. Hi David,

    Great advice!

    I think the school system is still stuck in its behaviorist past — promoting the myth that people are blank slates and can be moulded into whatever they want them to be. Yet every year, science reveals more and more that our mental abilities, motivations, temperament, etc. are all deeply influenced by our genes and early childhood experiences.

    We all have innate strengths and talents, and it’s important to know what they are! This can lead to great successes in life, and bring about feelings of self-worth and satisfaction.

    Warm regards,

    – Christopher

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